Show #152 (I think) Playlist, etc.

Dr. John


We’d have to be crazy to ignore our own creativity. All those things that you liked doing as a child that were “weird” and you were told were “bad” – remember those things? Okay, tormenting the neighbour’s cat was actually bad. I mean those crazy fun things that only kids get away with, but they train out of you, as you get older.

I remember a perfect example: when I was in grade 6, I had a small group of friends and never really paid attention to anyone else. That was, until I went outside for recess one frozen winter day and found a kid standing atop a snow mound as big as he, at four and a half feet, just around the corner of the door to the school. There were other kids further away, but no one within immediate earshot, and there he was, as loud as his tiny person’s voice could carry, to the other mounds of snow singing/shouting, with a big grin on his freckled face,

Ee leek tee eet. Ee leek tee eet, eet peoples in beekeenees!
Ay lake tay ate. Ay lake tay ate, ate peoples in beekeenees!

Clearly, this was someone I had to befriend.

One thing that I liked to do when I was a tyke was make up accents. I was usually going for what I thought was French or Chinese or just ended up with some silly gibberish accent. It was great! I’d do it all day.

Somewhere along the line, though, we’re trained out of this kind of behavior. It’s not proper to pick a mound and sing to the snow anymore. You’re not allowed to make up an accent and be silly all day.

Why not? Afraid of how you’ll look to people? Who cares? What do they know? They probably liked to quack for hours on end or draw on the walls.

Well, we both know there isn’t enough room for a long drawn-out analysis here. The only real point (if there is one) is that I think we should go out of our way to be silly for a day – or maybe even better – for a moment every day. Pick something ridiculous (but harmless, of course) and just do it.

One of the recent favourites I did was to add something totally unrelated to the end of every sentence [heating duct]. I managed to carry about my regular day, including going to work, etc. and end every sentence by muttering, exclaiming or even singing the same ridiculous thing [heating duct]. I got a few weird looks, but no one ever actually said a thing about it [heating duct]. 🙂

One more was when I picked a different decade of slang for each work day of the week starting with Monday being ’30s slang day and ending with ’70s on Friday. It was great! People like having their monotony broken more than you might….
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Tune in from 4:00 to 6:00 for some great music that will hopefully inspire you to be a little weird (or normal?). Creative. That’s the word.
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Show #151 (I think) Playlist, etc.

Deerhoof


How would you like to try something new? Well, not something that’s never been done before, but something new to you.

On the show (or often just on the blog) I’ve mentioned that music is this wonderfully powerful thing that everyone can identify but is not always just what it seems. If music is this thing that makes us feel, but we’re not quite sure which explanation as to why we feel that way is true or if any explanation is true at all.

Well, with all the ponderings of mad men/women in your head, try one of the following during the show (choose which best suits you)

1. Put on headphones, lay on the floor, smile and think about how sound can make you happy.

2. Turn your stereo way up and do something else you enjoy while listening as long as it isn’t too involved (no open-heart surgery, please).

3. Pour yourself some tea/wine/relaxing drink of choice, close your eyes and pretend you’re experiencing each artist/band playing just for you, right there in your living room or kitchen or bedroom or office space.

Let me know how you feel at the end of the show by leaving a comment on this page.

As always, tune in from 4:00 to 6:00 for some great music and hopefully a tinge of a warm, fuzzy feeling.
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Show #150 (I think) Playlist, etc.

The world is sound: Nada Brahma


Let the rhythm move you. Let your mind and body be at one with the pulse. Hear the drummer strike the sky! Drink the movement of the air. Music is not just a pleasing collection of sounds. Music is vibration and vibrations are all around us and within us; creating, changing, moving the world every second of every day.

When you listen to a piece of music that you’ve never heard before that makes you feel good, do you ever wonder why it does so? It’s just an organization of sounds. Why should it make you feel good? The same goes for music that makes you feel bad. It doesn’t need lyrics in order to do so (although they sometimes help). Just the music can totally change your mood – or even your perspective on life.

Think of Mozart’s Requium or James Brown’s I Feel Good.

It’s just an organization of sounds. Why should it make you feel any certain way?

I won’t go too much in-depth at this time, but there is a handful of good literature on the topic. I recommend Joachim-ernst Berendt’s The World Is Sound: Nada Brahma – Music and the Landscape of Consciousness as an intro or for a considerably heavier read, try Hazrat Inayat Kahn’s The Mysticism of Sound and Music.

Tune in from 4:00 to 6:00 for some great feeling music. Don’t forget to check out the Twitter feed for updates during the show. Send me a shout, if you’ve got the time!
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